walking the CBD in 35-40 degree temperatures

It was a relief to return to the coast of the  southern Fleurieu Peninsula late yesterday afternoon,  after spending around 5 hours  walking the CBD  of Adelaide  in 35-40 degrees heat.

I had taken the Subaru Outback into the West Terrace Jarvis   in Adelaide   for its regular service.    Walking the city and photographing it  with the new Sony A7r111 seemed like a good way to fill in time until I could  pick up  the car. I could then see how Adelaide had changed from when I had  lived there.

Adelaide  was on the cusp of change as we were living –becoming a post-industrial city. The urban life was more vibrant.

So I  walked around the CBD  from 8am to 1pm. However, I struggled in the summer heat and gave up the photography after walking around the  new medical precinct  along  the western part  of North Terrace.

Eventually I packed walking the city in  for some air conditioned comfort. I ended up  at the Flinders University City Gallery, and relaxed by  looking at the impressive  Helen Read Collection of Aboriginal art from the top end of Australia.
Continue reading “walking the CBD in 35-40 degree temperatures”

the summer-holidays are over

The early mornings along the coast of the southern Fleurieu Peninsula  over the summer-holidays were  often  quite colourful.  It’s was very picturesque and uplifting. An example of an early morning at Petrel Cove  during  the recent heat wave over  the  Australia Day weekend:

early morning , Petrel Cove

During the short periods of  the   summer’s heatwaves   we would start to   walk the poodles before sunrise in order to avoid the intensity of the heat. Then we would spend the rest of the  day inside an air-conditioned  house powered by our solar panels.     Continue reading “the summer-holidays are over”

photographing during the heatwave

During the recent January weekend heatwave in South Australia after our roadtrip  to,  and holiday in,  Melbourne  I ventured to  Kings Head in Waitpinga for the  afternoon walk with Maleko.

We did so to  find shade and shelter from  the  hot, burning sun. We usually  walk between  6-7pm,  and there is little by way of shade  along  the southern coast when there is no late afternoon cloud cover.

sea+granite, Kings Head

At one stage on the walk we just sat on some rocks in the shade at Kings Head  and watched the waves roll in around our feet. It was a section of rocks where the surfers jumped off into  the sea when the waves were rolling in between Kings Head and West Island.  Continue reading “photographing during the heatwave”

holidaying in Melbourne

Well,  the Mornington Peninsula in Melbourne, Victoria  sure was crowded with people holidaying when we stayed  there on our roadtrip.   Karen,  my sister at Safety Beach   put us up, and as that stay coincided with  a hot spell, that meant  both limited documentary photography in Melbourne    and  walking very early in the morning and late in the afternoon.

The foreshore  along the eastern  coast of Port Phillip Bay from Dromana to Sorrento was jam packed with   caravans,  tents, boats and people.   The Nepean Highway from  Rye to Portsea was crammed  with cars,  due  to people travelling down from Melbourne to Sorrento or Portsea  for a day’s outing. The Mornington Peninsula is Melbourne’s playground.

Martha Point, Mornington Peninsula

We found  very few places where  we could walk the poodles off lead along the coast.   There was  a small  off-lead, dog friendly   beach at Tassells  Cove and a small walking track around Martha Point that went down to  Pebble Beach.  Continue reading “holidaying in Melbourne”

a roadtrip to Melbourne

We–Suzanne, Kayla, Maleko and myself– leave early tomorrow morning on a roadtrip to Melbourne.  Our route is  Keith, Penola, the Hamilton Highway, Geelong, the  Queenscliff ferry to Sorrento. Our destination is Karen, my sister’s  place at  Safety Beach on the Mornington Peninsula.

winter, Dukes Highway, 2013

We will  stay  a week or so with Karen  then return to Adelaide via the Western/Dukes highways. This is a small  roadtrip–just to Melbourne and back.   Continue reading “a roadtrip to Melbourne”

afternoon walks

We–Suzanne, Maleko, Kayla and I — did some walks together  between,  and just after,   the Xmas-New Year period. We wanted   to avoid the Xmas crowds gathering around the coastal beaches,  and I had used google maps to  look for possible ways  for us to walk along Hindmarsh River.  Most of them  turned out to be duds. There were just no walking trails. It was mostly all private property.

One of the afternoon walks that we  did early in the new year (2018) was  one  along the  trail of  the Hindmarsh River,  which  ran adjacent to the old McCracken residential development.

Hindmarsh River trail

It had been years since we walked along the upper  section of the Hindmarsh River Walk . On the day we walked the river was  low,  with  little in the way of a flow, and we noticed that  there had been some planting on the old flood plain,  which was now a park with a playground.     Continue reading “afternoon walks”

memories

One of my memories of the  early morning walks that I used to do  in the last months of  Ari’s life in 2017 was one where I ‘d walk with him along Jetty Rd. On these occasions Suzanne  would  take   Kayla and Maleko up and over Rosetta Head,  and I would walk with Ari down to the beach, then along Jetty Rd, which runs around the foot of Rosetta Head.

Jetty Rd  runs from Whalers Convention Centre to the little jetty at the northern side of Rosetta Head,  and as it is easy walking, it was suitable for Ari.    The jetty is a favourite of the recreational fishermen and we’d alway meet someone fishing from the jetty early in the morning.

cactus leaves, Jetty Rd,

It was a slow walk to and from the jetty, and Ari and I  would often hang around an  old palm tree and cactus on our  way back. I would take a few photos with the little Olympus XZ-1 that  we had purchased for Suzanne to use on her various  walks.  Continue reading “memories”

Xmas

We are in the middle of the Xmas  summer holidays and the Heritage Trail    is now extremely popular, as is the beach at Petrel Cove.   As usual  the recreational  fishermen are out in force in their hunt the oceanic wilderness beyond the Encounter Marine Park for  the Southern Bluefin tuna.  This recreational fishing is still allowed  in Australia, despite the accepted global status of Bluefin tuna as an over-fished species.

There appears  to be a lot more people holidaying  on the southern coast of the Fleurieu Peninsula  this year. Maybe people are holidaying locally cos  the poor exchange rate for Australian  dollar  makes the overseas holiday trips too expensive?

Kayla and I have taken to walking around the empty streets of the township  at 6.30 am for our  early morning walks:

alleyway, Victor Harbor

We wander down any alleyway that we come across that would provide  some shade and protection from the wind.  The alleyways allow us  to avoid all  the runners and the bicyclists on the paths near the beach.  Continue reading “Xmas”

to walk the Heritage Trail

And so it was on  one fine summer morning that Kayla and I set out just after sunrise  to walk along the Heritage Trail to Dep’s Beach and beyond. The sun was popping  in and out of the  morning cloud cover, the coastal wind was still light, and the Nankeen  kestrels  were keeping us company.

swirling sea

We past the spot of  the swirling seas  and we made it  to the western  end  of Dep’s Beach without encountering any kangaroos,  runners, photographers or trail bike riders.

I had a photoshoot planned of  the rocks lying west of the beach–I envisioned a picture of the  granite rocks with soft morning light playing across their surface  with  a bit of cloud above them.   Continue reading “to walk the Heritage Trail”

Summer has arrived

Summer is here on the southern Fleurieu Peninsula coast in South Australia.

The  weather  has now settled into its normal summer pattern of  clear,  bright light; sunshine;   blue skies; and warm to hot temperatures.  Kayla and I  start  our walk  along the coastal rocks  early  in the morning in order to avoid the heat of the early morning sun.

We usually start  just after  sunrise:

Dep’s Beach landscape

On our  afternoon  walks Maleko and I  struggle with  the heat,   as the sun is still quite high  at 6pm,  and  there is little by way of open shade amongst the coastal rocks.   We   welcome the cool breeze that keeps the temperatures down and dread the hot, north-westerly wind.  Continue reading “Summer has arrived”