petrol stations

Ari and I have started walking around the Victor Harbor township on some of our early morning poodle walks. We needed a change from walking the beach at the western end of Encounter Bay each morning at dawn and I wanted to start walking earlier that 6.45am. We can wander around the town in the dark because of the street lights, and then I can take photos after dawn has broken.

There are only a few people about the town at this time of the morning–mostly groups of people walking across the causeway to Granite Island and back again.

Shell
Shell

The National Broadband Network people, who were very visible laying cable in the township and around Encounter Bay, seem to have disappeared. I don’t see any crews working on the streets whilst making my way back to Encounter Studio. And there I was thinking that the western end of Encounter Bay where we live would be getting FTTP in the next 6 months. That’s a dream.

The NBN Co appears to have slowed down its broadband rollout under the new Multi-Technology Mix (MTM) and I fear that our area of Encounter Bay will be outside the fibre footprint. Continue reading “petrol stations”

a quick trip

With the power at Victor Harbor of Friday from 8am to 4.30 pm we all drove up to Adelaide for the day to do bits and pieces—-haircuts, dropping off books and records, shopping at the Adelaide Central Market, and taking in exhibitions at the Light Gallery and CACSA. Ari and I were even able to do a small poodle walk in the CBD whilst we were waiting for Suzanne to drop off some old records at ReRun Records and Photography:

Porters Lane
Porters Lane

Whilst waiting we did a quick explore of some back alley ways off Pultney Street and behind Rundle Mall—eg., Porters Lane.

the Atkins film challenge

Ari and I drove up to Adelaide for the Akins Film Challenge on Friday, 13th February. We were driving in from the outer suburbs of Adelaide and were caught up in the peak hour commuter traffic along Goodwood Rd. The challenge starts at 9.15 am when you are handed a 120 roll of Fuji Velvia 100F film (now discontinued due to their withdrawing from the film business).

The rules of the challenge are: you have around 3 hours to expose the 12 exposures; it needs to be returned to Atkins by 1pm; Atkins processes the film; and you return the lab at 4pm to select your best picture. Atkins then undertakes to scan the transparency over the next few weeks, you make minor adjustments in post processing, then return it to Atkins in a week or so, who they then mount it for an exhibition in their foyer of the lab.

The general idea behind the film challenge is that the photography is done in Adelaide’s summer heat and in the harsh, glaring summer light. So it challenges the myth of only taking photos in good light. This time round the day was very hot but overcast and the light was very flat. Ari and I hung around in the car parks in the east end of Rundle Street, and I made a number of digital snaps whilst making the photos for the film challenge:

urban reflections
urban reflections

It was hot even in the car parks. After three hours work I was exhausted. I collapsed upon returning to the lab to hand in the film for processing. I recovered whilst having my lunch at the lab, then returned to the Sturt St townhouse to touch up the walls that had been damaged by the furniture removalists. It was the day of the settlement on Sturt St. The townhouse had been stripped and was awaiting the tenants. Continue reading “the Atkins film challenge”

along Franklin St

The last poodle walk Ari and I did whilst I was living in the Sturt St townhouse in Adelaide’s CBD was on the Sunday morning before we left the city to live on the coast at Encounter Bay. As Ari and I were saying goodbye to the city we had lived in for a decade it was appropriate that we visited a carpark:

Franklin Hotel
Franklin Hotel

As I now live 80 kilometres from Adelaide I will no longer be able to pop out and just aimlessly walk the city. It’s about a 70 minute drive from the southern Fleurieu Peninsula coast to the CBD Continue reading “along Franklin St”

Chesser St

The Sturt St townhouse is now under contract with settlement a month away,  and so it was okay for the poodles and myself to return to the Adelaide and mess the house up.

Ari and I spent early Sunday morning photographing the city, picking up from where I’d left off on a Sunday morning a fortnight ago.This time around it was with a medium format camera and  tripod  with long exposures as  it was overcast between  6 and 7 am.

Chesser St
Chesser St

As usual there was no one around -apart from  the odd male, rubbish truck  and taxi. The only difference this time were the groups of  bike riders in lyrca associated with The Tour Down Under. 

I really should have  been using a large format camera–ie., the Cambo 5×7 SC monorail— for this architectural work, but that had been left down at Victor Harbor.   I needed to bring the iMac back to  town work on for the next month or so that we are in the city.  Continue reading “Chesser St”

a deserted city

Ari and I wandered around the CBD of Adelaide on Sunday morning after returning from a few days holiday in Victor Harbor. We returned to Adelaide in order  to continue cleaning and painting the townhouse before it goes on the market in mid-January.

It was an eerie experience.  We were the only ones walking the city.

Bentham St
Bentham St

Then I realized that a CBD devoid of people was the Adelaide that I knew whilst I lived in the CBD. It is only in the last couple of years that Adelaide has changed in the sense that people now walk the streets. The CBD is no longer just a space for work and shopping since people–mostly young people– have started living in the city and spending their time on the street. Continue reading “a deserted city”

coming to an end

The days of living and walking in the CBD of Adelaide are coming to a close. The poodlewalk with Ari last Saturday morning will be one of the last as the townhouse is due to go on the market in mid-January.When it is sold–as we hope–then that will be the end of us living in the CBD.

Ibis Hotel
Ibis Hotel

We now live in the townhouse in order to scrub it up–clean it and paint it –for sale. The cameras, computers and scanners are now at Victor Harbor, which is the southern outer suburban rim of Adelaide. We are about one and half hours travelling time by car from the CBD. The car, rather than walking, will now be our primary mode of transport. There is no public transport from the CBD to the outer suburban coastal rim. Nor will there be.
Continue reading “coming to an end”

making cities liveable

Walking around Adelaide’s CBD with Ari has enabled me to see that  urban design in Adelaide, since the 1960s,   has been structured around keep the car happy.

Its been about suburban sprawl, traffic efficiency and parking spaces rather than public spaces for people to gather. The assumed model of urban design is the old modernist one— modern cities are about high-rises and good windy spaces rather than being about the human lives lived within the city.

Rowlands apartments
Rowlands apartments

It was only liveable because it was small or compact and so avoided the congestion of Sydney. The recent shift is towards densifying  Adelaide  around the core infrastructure, transport hubs and a diversity of income groups in the CBD. Continue reading “making cities liveable”

slowness

If cities are now seen as ‘engines for innovation and growth’, then the smart city paradigm is seen to involve the application of information and communication technology, environmental sensors, digital footprints of the inhabitants, manipulation of the resulting data using statistical techniques, and finally the use of complexity modelling and advanced visualisation in order to make sense of it all.

These assemblages aim to promote efficiency, productivity, and safety and to reduce uncertainty in the management of places. Smart city initiatives have been closely linked to the forms of accelerated living that increasingly dominate everyday life in the global metropolitan era. Smart cities are fast cities, efficient cities, controlled cities.

Currie St
Currie St

Poodlewalks are about slowness in a city increasingly dominated by speed and movement, acceleration and flow–wandering into car parks and observing the light on the built environment. Slowness stands for slowing down–for deceleration, detour, delay, interruption, inertia, stoppage and immobility. It stands for decelerated living in the context of the embrace and internalization of a culture of speed and hypermobility (of people, data, goods, capital, etc).

walking the South Rd Superway

It was another Friday night with Suzanne and Maleko going to puppy pre-school at Regency Park and Ari and I filling in time by walking the South Rd Superway for an hour or so. We started out on the A13 from the South Rd/Grand Junction Rd corner and continued walking west for 25 minutes.

South Rd Superway
South Rd Superway

It was bright and sunny at 6.30 pm and, fortunately for us, most of the traffic was moving on the elevated roadway. So I was able to scope the urbanscape underneath. I didn’t really know what to expect. All I had in mind were some possibilities for a 5×7 large format photoshoot from the brief previous scouting. So we wandered.