holidaying in Melbourne

Well,  the Mornington Peninsula in Melbourne, Victoria  sure was crowded with people holidaying when we stayed  there on our roadtrip.   Karen,  my sister at Safety Beach   put us up, and as that stay coincided with  a hot spell, that meant  both limited documentary photography in Melbourne    and  walking very early in the morning and late in the afternoon.

The foreshore  along the eastern  coast of Port Phillip Bay from Dromana to Sorrento was jam packed with   caravans,  tents, boats and people.   The Nepean Highway from  Rye to Portsea was crammed  with cars,  due  to people travelling down from Melbourne to Sorrento or Portsea  for a day’s outing. The Mornington Peninsula is Melbourne’s playground.

Martha Point, Mornington Peninsula

We found  very few places where  we could walk the poodles off lead along the coast.   There was  a small  off-lead, dog friendly   beach at Tassells  Cove and a small walking track around Martha Point that went down to  Pebble Beach.  Continue reading “holidaying in Melbourne”

a roadtrip to Melbourne

We–Suzanne, Kayla, Maleko and myself– leave early tomorrow morning on a roadtrip to Melbourne.  Our route is  Keith, Penola, the Hamilton Highway, Geelong, the  Queenscliff ferry to Sorrento. Our destination is Karen, my sister’s  place at  Safety Beach on the Mornington Peninsula.

winter, Dukes Highway, 2013

We will  stay  a week or so with Karen  then return to Adelaide via the Western/Dukes highways. This is a small  roadtrip–just to Melbourne and back.   Continue reading “a roadtrip to Melbourne”

in Melbourne: thinking about Flickr

It is argued that in contrast to the Kodak culture, where a small group of persons (friends and family) share oral stories around images with others, the digital new culture of the image on Flickr, the  photo-sharing site,  is one where a large-scaled conversation is shared with people that participants don’t know in real life.

Chiko Chip Shop
Chiko Chip Shop

That large-scaled conversation shared with people used to be the case with Flickr, but it is less so know. Flickr’s key strengths are seen as photo sharing and storage. Around 2005/2006  it  was the best online photo management and sharing application in the world.  There was the social sharing  which used to be quite active in a community sense because Flickr was a place where people who took  photography more seriously  went.

No longer. The impact of the mobile phone has meant  that people tick the ‘like’ button for an particular image, rather than comment or engage in a large scale conversation on other people’s photos. I used to engage in the conversations but with Yahoo’s recent (2013) revamp/redesign  of Flickr I more or less drop an image into my photo stream and run. The new style Flickr represents a “sea change” in its purpose. Continue reading “in Melbourne: thinking about Flickr”

Melbourne: near Macaulay Station

The topographic shoot under the South East Freeway on Monday with the 5×4 near the Moonee Ponds Creek was not successful. It took me ages to get to the Macaulay Railway station on the Upfield line from Safety Beach.

I arrived about 11.30 am, set up the camera, took one picture, then the cloud cover disappeared and the midday sun came out. It was too bright for me as was working in dark shadow on the south side of the freeway. So I scoped the picture I wanted to take and packed it in.

near Macaulay Station, Melbourne

As I was leaving to go to the airport on the Skybus the cloud cover returned. Them’s the breaks, I thought.

funky Melbourne

The Melbourne trip is coming to an end. Suzanne leaves for Adelaide today, and I fly out early tomorrow afternoon. The few days have gone real quick.

This picture is from Thursday when I visited Smith St, Fitzroy. It’s a little cafe near Johnston Street where I had a quick lunch before meeting up with Stuart Murdoch at the Centre of Contemporary Photography:

cafe, Smith St, Melbourne

Whilst at the CCP I glanced through an old issue of UN. magazine, which featured the work of Eliza Hutchinson who was exhibiting some work in Gallery 3.

Melbourne: a hotel window view

Sunday was a day that Suzanne and I planned to spend together, so early this morning I took some pictures through the window of our room in the hotel. We are on the 15th floor of Oaks on Collins, which is in Melbourne’s CBD and are looking south to the Yarra River, Southbank and Crown Casino.

view from Oaks on Collins, Melbourne

There was sunshine this morning. I took some pictures because rain is forecast for the next couple of days and there may well be no sun tomorrow morning. Without the sun the urban light is dull and flat.

Melbourne: and it rained

I flew into Melbourne early this morning.

Qantas

I started taking photos after I checked my gear into the hotel —Oaks on Collins—along Flinders Lane. I had seen a carpark whilst walking on Collins St with my gear from the Southern Cross Station. I hadn’t taken much notice of it before, even though I walk Flinders Lane each time I’m in Melbourne.

Melbourne: Gardners Creek

I’m off to Melbourne early Thursday morning on a phototrip.

This will include being a flaneur in the CBD and a large format photoshoot with Stuart Murdoch around the Glenferrie Bridge that crosses Gardiner’s Creek. I had already scoped it—here and here with the Olympus XZ-1 on my waay back from Tasmania in May.

Gardners Creek, Melbourne

The topographical project around the bridges and the South Eastern freeway is a working towards an exhibition for the Ballart International Foto Biennale 2013.

under the Monash Freeway

Whilst we were in Melbourne waiting to see if Atget would recover from his operation I spent an afternoon on a photowalk with Stuart Murdoch along Gardiners Creek near, and under, the Monash Freeway.

Gardiners Creek, East Hawthorne.

We walked along a small section of Gardners Creek and the first stop was this old Toorak Rd bridge where the creek became more or less a drain, rather than a creek. It was what is called heavily urbanised. The creek has been degraded in much the same way as many of the other Melbourne eastern suburban waterways.

on the Nepean Highway

The last poodlewalk in Melbourne was done by car. On my previous visits to Melbourne I’d seen some architecture on the Nepean Highway that caught my eye, whilst I travelling on the Frankston train to the CBD. So we–Suzanne, Ari and myself— cruised the Nepean Highway from Frankston to Mordiallic looking for “Custom Framing” and a big bold blue building.

Nepean Highway, Melbourne

It was the day that we had Agtet, our grey standard poodle, put down. We were to drive back to Adelaide early the next morning, and we had heavy hearts and time on our hands. A phototrip in the car was my way of filling in the afternoon. Suzanne drove the car whilst I looked out for the building.