Victor Harbor township

The period inbetween the photo session in Melbourne and the  training walks for the camel trek in the Northern Flinders  involved me  photographing in the Victor Harbor township whilst Kayla and  I have been on our  early morning poodlewalks.

We only  do this urban walk occasionally–it provides shelter when it is raining or the coastal winds are gale force.  Since this coastal township is quite small,   this early morning walk needs to incorporate the beach around the Granite Island causeway.

old posters, Victor Harbor

I do find it a sad and depressing township to walk around in the early morning with Kayla.  What is so noticeable apart from the empty streets  are  the number of the small shops along Ocean Street, the main street, that  really struggle to survive.

empty shop, Victor Harbor

These shops come and go and they don’t really last all that long. This is  in spite of the upgrade to  Ocean Street by the Victor Harbor  Council to revitalise the town centre,  and to make it more attractive for the day tourists to stroll around in.  Continue reading “Victor Harbor township”

A foggy photowalk

We had a  foggy photowalk when  Heather Petty stayed with us at Encounter Bay over the weekend.  She arrived late Friday afternoon  and  returned to Adelaide  on Sunday afternoon. Encounter Bay provides  a  relaxing time away  from her work and daily routines in Adelaide. It’s time out so, to speak.

We went on a couple of  photowalks together  with the poodles along the coast over the weekend.   She joined us on the Friday afternoon,  as we slowly made our way  along the granite rocks towards Deps Beach  from Kings Beach Rd, where I had parked the Forester.

It was an enjoyable   photowalk as there  was little wind, the temperature was  pleasant and the  autumn light was soft:

seascape

The   Sunday  morning walk was notable  for its dense,  foggy conditions, which are rather unusual on the coast of the southern Fleurieu Peninsula.  The fog is  quite different to the more normal  misty, autumn mornings. 

Fog, Petty, Kayla

The tide was also very low that morning,  and so  we were able to venture amongst the rocks that would  usually  be inaccessible because of the waves sweeping across the rocks.   Kayla did her standing guard thing whilst we photographed.  Continue reading “A foggy photowalk”

an intertidal zone

It is now autumn in South Australia and I am  very slowly adjusting back  to the bleak, dry landscape  of  the Fleurieu Peninsula after my   brief but enjoyable sojourn briefly walking  Wellington,  New Zealand. I  flew over at short notice  to participate in Photobook/NZ and  to link up with, and re-join,  PhotoForum. 

For better or worse  South Australia  is where I have made my home,  and the coastal landscape of  the southern Fleurieu Peninsula   is, to all intents and purposes,  my  photographic backyard.

purple quartz

This  is where a body of work —The Littoral Zone—is gradually evolving  from walking through and exploring the ever-changing interface or habitat between the land and the sea along this  particular coastline.   Continue reading “an intertidal zone”

memories

One of my memories of the  early morning walks that I used to do  in the last months of  Ari’s life in 2017 was one where I ‘d walk with him along Jetty Rd. On these occasions Suzanne  would  take   Kayla and Maleko up and over Rosetta Head,  and I would walk with Ari down to the beach, then along Jetty Rd, which runs around the foot of Rosetta Head.

Jetty Rd  runs from Whalers Convention Centre to the little jetty at the northern side of Rosetta Head,  and as it is easy walking, it was suitable for Ari.    The jetty is a favourite of the recreational fishermen and we’d alway meet someone fishing from the jetty early in the morning.

cactus leaves, Jetty Rd,

It was a slow walk to and from the jetty, and Ari and I  would often hang around an  old palm tree and cactus on our  way back. I would take a few photos with the little Olympus XZ-1 that  we had purchased for Suzanne to use on her various  walks.  Continue reading “memories”

Xmas

We are in the middle of the Xmas  summer holidays and the Heritage Trail    is now extremely popular, as is the beach at Petrel Cove.   As usual  the recreational  fishermen are out in force in their hunt the oceanic wilderness beyond the Encounter Marine Park for  the Southern Bluefin tuna.  This recreational fishing is still allowed  in Australia, despite the accepted global status of Bluefin tuna as an over-fished species.

There appears  to be a lot more people holidaying  on the southern coast of the Fleurieu Peninsula  this year. Maybe people are holidaying locally cos  the poor exchange rate for Australian  dollar  makes the overseas holiday trips too expensive?

Kayla and I have taken to walking around the empty streets of the township  at 6.30 am for our  early morning walks:

alleyway, Victor Harbor

We wander down any alleyway that we come across that would provide  some shade and protection from the wind.  The alleyways allow us  to avoid all  the runners and the bicyclists on the paths near the beach.  Continue reading “Xmas”

Aerial: The coast from above

I had the great fortune to  experiment with  some aerial photography yesterday. I was given the opportunity   to  fly along part of the southern Fleurieu Peninsula coastline,   courtesy of  Chris Dearden  in his yellow, homebuilt    Sonex aircraft– a Xenos motorglider.

It was the first time  that I’d  had the opportunity  to  experiment with  aerial photography and flying in a recreational aircraft was a blast.

Rosetta Head

We took off from Goolwa airport and  flew along the coast from the Murray Mouth near Goolwa  to Newland Heads in Waitpinga, then back again.  The above image  is a picture of Rosetta Head, Petrel Cove and Dep’s Beach, which is  where  we  do a lot of  our coastal poodlewalks.  Continue reading “Aerial: The coast from above”

on The Bluff

Whilst Suzanne was away walking the Wilderness Trail on Kangaroo Island with her walking friends, I looked after, and walked, the two standard poodles twice a day.  That’s the daily  routine with hunting dogs.

Maleko + Kayla

These portraits of Maleko and Kayla was made whilst we were on an early morning walk up, over and down Rosetta Head  (or The Bluff). Ari had  just died a few days earlier, before Suzanne  went walking on  Kangaroo Island.

We were hanging about on the top of The Bluff having a bit of fun as it had been the first time I’d walked up Rosetta Head in the early morning for ages

Continue reading “on The Bluff”

portraiture

Kayla is still on restricted walks. Though the courses of anti-inflammatories has finished, she continues to be walked on her own both morning and afternoon to allow the ligaments around her knees to heal. I walk her in the morning and Maleko in the afternoon. Suzanne does the opposite. We are playing it safe. No rough chasing games.

This allows me time to continue to work on The Littoral Zone project. Some recent examples:– an abstraction; a rockpool granite rocks along the coast; and an open air studio images.

A portrait of Kayla at Petrel Cove:

Kayla

These solo walks will change tomorrow as I am off on a photo trip to the South Australia Mallee for 5 days, and so Suzanne will have to walk both dogs together. She will need to exercise her skills to prevent them from playing their mad chasing games, or chasing kangaroos.

Continue reading “portraiture”

a misty, autumn morning

Whilst Suzanne has been away walking the Heysen Trail in and around the Flinders Ranges with friends, I have been without internet access for 4 days. It was disconnected on Thursday. Internode , I discovered, was rebuilding the NBN gateway at Stirling because those on the NBN broadband were experiencing frequent dropout–probably due to live streaming Netflix.  Whilst I was disconnected I realised just how integral the internet is to my life.

Internode advised me this morning that they had things at their end finally up and running.  However, I still had no access. I was then on the mobile phone with Internode’s tech support for 3 hours to reconfigure the Fritzbox 7490 before studio’s  computers could access the internet. (We finally realised that the Fritzbox’s wizard was playing up and the settings in the Fritzbox modem  had to be manually configured). We are still experiencing problems connecting the Fritzbox modem and the VoIP FritzFon: a second session with tech support this afternoon failed to establish a phone connection via the Fritzbox.

After being connected this morning I quickly uploaded a couple of images into my digital gallery for the Mallee Routes project that I working on.

Whilst I was disconnected from the internet the local boat ramp car park was still being extended, mainstream newspapers continue to sack their photographers, and I continued to walk the 3 standard poodles in the morning and evening. These are autumn days on the Fleurieu Peninsula in South Australia, and the mornings can be quite spectacular:

am, Baum Rd, Waitpinga

There was heavy mist on the fields along Baum Rd on Saturday morning, and the mist hung around after sunrise. The next morning I took my film cameras with me on the early morning walk along  Baum Rd hoping for a repeat, but there there wasn’t any mist at all. Unfortunately, for me, there hasn’t been any mist since. Dam.

Continue reading “a misty, autumn morning”

returning to normal

The high summer season is over, people have returned to work, and we are back from our holiday in Tasmania. Life on the coast, with its early morning and late afternoon poodlewalks, is starting to return to normal.

rock, feather, seaweed
rock, feather, seaweed

I had been busy working on The Bowden Archives and Other Marginalia project throughout January and I didn’t really have the time to update poodlewalks, even though I’d been doing the daily walks.
Continue reading “returning to normal”