cream brick

One of my options in our restricted poodlewalks during the current grass seed season is to park the Forester in Kent Reserve, walk west along the Encounter Bay beach towards Rosetta Head, then back along Franklin Parade to the Forester. That way I can see some of the seaside architecture along Franklin Parade that runs alongside the beach and the reef. It is a popular walking spot.

The seaside architecture is very varied and the built environment along the foreshore is undergoing change. The modest, older style beach-side shacks are being replaced by two story McMansions that take up the whole block. Some of the older architecture is at odds with the coastal environment as it is mass produced, suburban architecture from the 1950s and 1960s that has just been dumped into a coastal environment:

cream brick, Franklin Parade
cream brick, Franklin Parade

These kind of cream brick seaside houses do have a certain kind of historical charm and they have shown themselves to be resilient in the salty coastal environment, but I personally don’t find them very attractive.

Other people are doing up their older style shacks to make them look more modern:

renovated shack
renovated shack

Even though a lot of money goes into these kind of renovations the beachside shack remains unused for most of the year. I have only seen people in this shack once–for a couple of days– since the renovations were finished early this year.

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