at Petrel-Cove

Many of the coastal morning poodlewalks with Kayla incorporate the  return walk along the coastal  rocks  to the car park  via Petrel-Cove. Incorporating Petrel Cove  is more frequent in the early spring,  due to my  allergy to the rye grass growing along the side of the coastal path.  It irritates my eyes and causes sneezing fits.

Occasionally there is a photographer on the beach or a surfer  but more often  than not,  the  only other person in  Petrel Cove at that time of the morning is  the odd fishing man:

fisherman, Petrel Cove

Often it seem as if the fishing men  standing on the edge of the sea with their lines are meditating in nature,  and are  not overly  concerned if they don’t  catch any fish.  I can understand that as I often just sit on the rocks and watch the action of the waves.  Continue reading “at Petrel-Cove”

sea-mist

The sea-mist doesn’t happen that often along the southern coast of  the Fleurieu Peninsula. It happens maybe about once or twice a year,  and it can be quite localised.

The sea mist  briefly appeared early one morning  late last week on the coast:

sea mist, Petrel Cove

When I saw it I hoped  the it was thick  enough for me to photograph some of the granite rocks amongst the seamiest,  as  had happened on a previous occasion.       Continue reading “sea-mist”

revisiting the American River photos

I have  finally started adding some  images to the  skeleton galleries  of this low -fi website–eg., it is the  portrait and the road trip galleries that I have been working on.  The additions are  adding some  flesh to the skeleton, as it were.

In going back through my 2018  digital archives on the hard drive of the  2017 iMac  I  came across the images  that I had made whilst  on  my  brief holiday  at  American River on Kangaroo Island in South Australia.

seascape, American River

The images that caught my eye were the ones I made on an early morning autumn walk along the shoreline of the estuary on my  last day of the  brief  holiday. I had never done this on previous visits,   as I had though that this part of the estuary at American River  was more or less inaccessible. Continue reading “revisiting the American River photos”

squalls

During the winter of 2018 the southern coast of  the Fleurieu Peninsula has  been battered by king tides squalls and gusty, cold  northwesterly winds  off and on for a couple of weeks at a time.  It is off and on because in -between  these intense,  northerly winds we have the winter’s standard south westerly winds bringing  rain in from  Western Australia.

rain + sun, Waitpinga

The rain eventually clears after a couple of days,  we have a fine day,  then we are back to the gusty northerlies again. Sometimes these changes in the weather  can be quite  atmospheric.

On the days of rain it is a matter of trying to  go on the poodlewalks inbetween the passing showers,  and then  hoping that we don’t get caught in a squall out in the open.  Often we see a lone surfer, and on other days there are groups of people standing on the cliffs look out to sea, presumably whale watching.  Continue reading “squalls”

winter’s wild-seas

I spent the last few days taking advantage of the sunny mornings before I left  for Alpana Station near   Blinman, to go on  a 13 day   camel trek in the Northern Flinders Ranges in South Australia with Suzanne and some of  her Heysen Trail friends.

seaweed+sand

This fine weather did not last  for long. The weather turned story,  and I ended up  exploring the wild-seas amongst the coastal granite rocks  between Petrel Cove and Kings Beach. Continue reading “winter’s wild-seas”

foam

The severe storm that swept across  South Australia in early May,  produced  lots of sea foam amongst the granite rocks along  the coast.  These wintery conditions, which started as I was returning on the ferry from  my brief holiday at American River,     forced me to  postpone, and then cut short,  my photo-camp  at Lake Boga for the Mallee Routes project.

I had to wait for the severity of the storm to ease before we were able to walk  amongst  the coastal rocks. It was wet, the south westerly wind was gale like,  and the waves were huge as they rolled into the shore.

foam, Petrel Cove

I was able  to spend a few days on our  morning and afternoon  poodlewalks with Kayla and Maleko  photographing the ephemeral foam amongst the granite rocks.  It seems to come with winter.  Continue reading “foam”

the summer-holidays are over

The early mornings along the coast of the southern Fleurieu Peninsula  over the summer-holidays were  often  quite colourful.  It’s was very picturesque and uplifting. An example of an early morning at Petrel Cove  during  the recent heat wave over  the  Australia Day weekend:

early morning , Petrel Cove

During the short periods of  the   summer’s heatwaves   we would start to   walk the poodles before sunrise in order to avoid the intensity of the heat. Then we would spend the rest of the  day inside an air-conditioned  house powered by our solar panels.     Continue reading “the summer-holidays are over”

photographing during the heatwave

During the recent January weekend heatwave in South Australia after our roadtrip  to,  and holiday in,  Melbourne  I ventured to  Kings Head in Waitpinga for the  afternoon walk with Maleko.

We did so to  find shade and shelter from  the  hot, burning sun. We usually  walk between  6-7pm,  and there is little by way of shade  along  the southern coast when there is no late afternoon cloud cover.

sea+granite, Kings Head

At one stage on the walk we just sat on some rocks in the shade at Kings Head  and watched the waves roll in around our feet. It was a section of rocks where the surfers jumped off into  the sea when the waves were rolling in between Kings Head and West Island.  Continue reading “photographing during the heatwave”

holidaying in Melbourne

Well,  the Mornington Peninsula in Melbourne, Victoria  sure was crowded with people holidaying when we stayed  there on our roadtrip.   Karen,  my sister at Safety Beach   put us up, and as that stay coincided with  a hot spell, that meant  both limited documentary photography in Melbourne    and  walking very early in the morning and late in the afternoon.

The foreshore  along the eastern  coast of Port Phillip Bay from Dromana to Sorrento was jam packed with   caravans,  tents, boats and people.   The Nepean Highway from  Rye to Portsea was crammed  with cars,  due  to people travelling down from Melbourne to Sorrento or Portsea  for a day’s outing. The Mornington Peninsula is Melbourne’s playground.

Martha Point, Mornington Peninsula

We found  very few places where  we could walk the poodles off lead along the coast.   There was  a small  off-lead, dog friendly   beach at Tassells  Cove and a small walking track around Martha Point that went down to  Pebble Beach.  Continue reading “holidaying in Melbourne”

to walk the Heritage Trail

And so it was on  one fine summer morning that Kayla and I set out just after sunrise  to walk along the Heritage Trail to Dep’s Beach and beyond. The sun was popping  in and out of the  morning cloud cover, the coastal wind was still light, and the Nankeen  kestrels  were keeping us company.

swirling sea

We past the spot of  the swirling seas  and we made it  to the western  end  of Dep’s Beach without encountering any kangaroos,  runners, photographers or trail bike riders.

I had a photoshoot planned of  the rocks lying west of the beach–I envisioned a picture of the  granite rocks with soft morning light playing across their surface  with  a bit of cloud above them.   Continue reading “to walk the Heritage Trail”